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Angus MacLean - Signed

Prints

Angus MacLean - Signed

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Angus MacLean - Signed

50.00

Title: J. Angus MacLean Signed Photograph
Description: Color photographic print. Image measures 5 x 3 7/8". Hand-signed in black pen. Photo appears to date from the period MacLean was Premier of Prince Edward Island (May 3, 1979 – November 17, 1981).

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ohn Angus MacLean, (1914–2000) was a politician and farmer in Prince Edward Island. He studied science at both Mount Allison University and the University of British Columbia, but left farming to enlist in the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War II achieving the rank of Wing Commander. After the war, MacLean returned to PEI and ran for a seat in the House of Commons. He was defeated twice as a Progressive Conservative candidate, but, eventually, won a by-election in 1951. He remained in Ottawa for 25 years. During the government of Prime Minister John Diefenbaker, MacLean served as Minister of Fisheries. In 1976, MacLean was persuaded to return to PEI to take over the leadership of the provincial Progressive Conservatives. He led the party to victory in 1979. His government emphasized rural community life, banned new shopping malls, and instituted a Royal Commission to examine land use and urban sprawl. His government also cancelled PEI's participation in the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station in New Brunswick. In August 1981, MacLean announced his intention to resign as premier upon the election of a new party leader. He stepped down three months later when James Lee was sworn-in as his successor. MacLean left politics returning to his family farm. In 1991, he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada. He died in Charlottetown.