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George Ackermann (1999)

Books

George Ackermann (1999)

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PEIBookAckermann1996a.jpg
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PEIBookAckermann1996c.jpg

George Ackermann (1999)

50.00

Title: George Ackermann (1803-1891): Brave New Worlds
Author: Ted Fraser
Publisher: Confederation Centre of the Arts, Charlottetown, PEI: 1999
Description: Oblong 4to. Unpaginated (72 pp). Illustrated. Softcover. Catalogue for an exhibitionLandscape sketches in the form of bird's eye views (or aerial panoramic views) were a popular way of portraying landscapes in the 1800s. They were not just images of place, but were a kind of map of space. One important recorder of landscapes who used these kinds of views was a Canadian immigrant artist named George Ackermann. He created topographical and botanical watercolours - sketches of landscapes and plants. He managed Ackermann and Co., a well-known publisher of topographical prints in London, England, and he travelled frequently, painting in Central and South America.

He emigrated to Canada, settling in Western Canada in 1859. He later spent seven years teaching art in Ontario before moving east in 1877 to Summerside, Prince Edward Island. His views of settlements were shaped by his experience as manager of a London publishing house and art gallery that published bird's eye views and panoramas. He wanted to get away from illustrations that were dull and without atmosphere, and tried to produce images inspired by the true nature of place and community.

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George Ackermann emigrated to Canada, settling in Western Canada in 1859. He later spent seven years teaching art in Ontario before moving east in 1877 to Summerside, Prince Edward Island. His views of settlements were shaped by his experience as manager of Ackermann and Co., a well-known publisher of topographical prints in London. He wanted to get away from illustrations that were dull and without atmosphere, and tried to produce images inspired by the true nature of place and community. Ackermann created topographical and botanical watercolours - sketches of landscapes and plants.